Glossary


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16) Collision prevention

The use of sensors to detect the presence of objects and, through the use of integrated controls, prevent a collision between two objects from occurring.

17) Excess gain

The point at which just enough light intensity is present to trigger a photoelectric sensor given the usable area of the lens,  For example, an excess gain of two would mean that just enough light intensity is present to trigger a sensor with 50% of the lens obscured with contaminants.

18) Data transmission

The use of sensors to transmit data via pulse-modulated light beam systems typically from host stations to mobile carriers such as AGV's or stacker cranes.

19) Lot reconciliation

The use of sensors to count the number of objects that pass a particular point in the material handling system for purposes of reconciling actual production or material movement with planned production.

20) Positioning

The use of sensor arrays to detect the position of an object in the material handling system typically for the purpose of applying a bar code or other identifier to the object.

21) Second surface reflection

A problem for polarized retro-reflective sensors that is created by shiny objects wrapped in shiny material.  The wrapping material can depolarize the light as it passes through.

22) Target of flight

A measurement principle used in electronic distance measuring sensors based on the length of time it takes for a light pulse to travel from transmission to reception back from the target.

23) Deadband

An unusable area extending from the face of an ultrasonic proximity sensor to the minimum sensing distance allowing for target detection where pulses are received too quickly to be accurately evaluated.

24) Zero pressure accumulation conveyor

A type of powered conveyor accumulation. Zero pressure accumulation is that which occurs when the driving force is completely removed form the load. This is usually accomplished by way of sensors in combination with various mechanical means such that when a load is stopped on a sensor, the driving force in the zone behind the stopped load is dropped away. When the next load is driven into the now dead zone, it too will stop, causing a like chain reaction upstream, or until such time that the first stopped load is released and moves on. Discharge from an accumulation point can be either one load at a time or a so-called slug discharge, where a pre-specified number of loads are released at one time.

25) Self-Guided Vehicle

A Self-Guided Vehicle (SGV) is an autonomous, self-directed robotic delivery system for the movement of product in diverse environments. An SGV operates independently to navigate around fixed and moving obstructions without the need for an external guide path network or sensors, such as buried wires or mounted magnetic or optical strips. Instead, an SGV uses on-board sensory inputs and navigational software to dynamically plot a path as the robot moves to each goal or task destination. See also AGV or Automatic Guided Vehicle  or AGVS .

26) SGV

A Self-Guided Vehicle (SGV) is an autonomous, self-directed robotic delivery system for the movement of product in diverse environments. An SGV operates independently to navigate around fixed and moving obstructions without the need for an external guide path network or sensors, such as buried wires or mounted magnetic or optical strips. Instead, an SGV uses on-board sensory inputs and navigational software to dynamically plot a path as the robot moves to each goal or task destination.