Glossary


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16) Telescoping belt conveyor

A belt conveyor whose length can be varied by telscoping slides on the frame.

17) Gravity roller conveyor

A conveyor which supports the load on a series of rollers with internal ball bearing rings mounted on axles at fixed intervals in a frame. Roller conveyors come in straight sections, curved sections and in various spur and merge sections.

18) Non-contact accumulation conveyor

Non -contact accumulation on a conveyor occurs when the product is accumulated with a definite space between each accumulated load. This is accomplished by controlling the speed of the carrying surface. Most zero pressure conveyors are of the non contact type.

19) Tow line conveyor

A conveyor embedded in the floor which provides power to wheeled carriers moving along the floor.

20) Vertical reciprocating conveyor

A conveyor that moves perpendicular to the floor and provides intermittent operation of a single load-carrying platform or cage which travels up and down on steel rails or guideways. There are many configurations of vertical reciprocating conveyors (VRCs) including those with a single mast, single rail, double mast, double rail and even models which offer incline travel versus strict vertical travel. There are also numerous platform configurations ranging from a simple flat steel surface to a powered roller conveyor deck with controls that are integrated with the controls of powered feed and take away conveyor lines at the different levels.

21) Power and free conveyor

A variation of overhead chain conveyor is "power and free". In a conventional overhead conveyor the carrier is permanently fastened to the drive chain, in the power and free case the carrier can mechanically disengage from the drive chain and essentially idle while the chain continues to move. Power and free conveyors can also be inverted so that they can be mounted to the floor, in which case the carrier or tray rides on top of the guiding rail as opposed to being suspended beneath it.

22) Live roller conveyor

The most common conveyor used in large warehouses and distribution centers. Rollers are powered through various means and therein producing movement in needed direction. The load is supported directly by the roller mounted in a frame.

23) Gravity wheel conveyor

Ideal for light duty handling requirements where the load is flat and smooth, gravity wheel conveyors support the load on a series of skate wheels mounted on a shaft in a frame. The conveyor sections can be either rigid (straight or curved) or flexible. In the latter case, the frame is actually an accordion frame capable of being expanded or curved, making it ideal for temporary applications such as the loading and unloading of over-the-road trucks.

24) Minimum pressure accumulation conveyor

Conveyor minimum pressure accumulation is when product is accumulated and the driving force is not removed. It is called minimum pressure because the pressure of the driving force is kept to a minimum. Pressure will build up as more product accumulates, but can be overcome with controls designed specifically for the application. The advantage to minimum pressure conveyor is a higher discharge or single load release rate than with zero pressure accumulation.

25) Slider belt conveyor

A simple and inexpensive form of powered conveyor. A single section will have a large roller at both ends, one of which is powered by a pulley type belt connected to a motor. The belt is literally slide over a flat surface therein conveying the load on a horizontal plane or carrying loads up an incline.

26) Roller belt conveyor

A powered form of conveyor where the transporting belt is supported by rollers spaced along the frame, not unlike a gravity roller section. Power and forward motion is transferred by utilizing a moving belt powered by a pulley and motor configuration at one end of the section. Capable of handling rather heavy loads.

27) Cross belt sorter conveyor

Another form of the tray sorter is where the tray is replaced by a short belt conveyor section with its direction of travel orientated perpendicular to the line of travel of the main train. At the proper moment the belt stepper motor is energized propelling its load to either side and the desired takeaway lane. See also Tray sorter .

28) Shoe sorter conveyor

The conveying surface consists of continuously linked slats. The linked slats move in a manner similar to a belt. Between each slat, along one side, there is a shoe that moves along with the slats. Each shoe is capable of simultaneous independent lateral movement from one side of the conveyor to the other at the same time as it continues to move forward. At the appropriate time, controls sequence as many shoes as necessary, depending on the size of the load, to move from one side of the conveyor to the other, contacting the side of the load, thus directing the load to one of multiple discharge or take-away lanes. The take-away lanes can be powered by gravity. At the end of the run, after the last take-away lane, and on the return (remember the main sort lines move like a belt), the shoes are all reset to their original side. Such sorters are capable of higher sort rates in the range of 150 cases per minute. Another name for this type of sorter is surfing sorter .

29) Zero pressure accumulation conveyor

A type of powered conveyor accumulation. Zero pressure accumulation is that which occurs when the driving force is completely removed form the load. This is usually accomplished by way of sensors in combination with various mechanical means such that when a load is stopped on a sensor, the driving force in the zone behind the stopped load is dropped away. When the next load is driven into the now dead zone, it too will stop, causing a like chain reaction upstream, or until such time that the first stopped load is released and moves on. Discharge from an accumulation point can be either one load at a time or a so-called slug discharge, where a pre-specified number of loads are released at one time.

30) Car-in-track conveyor

A sophisticated version of asynchronous carriers with greater flexibility inherent in the drive systems in terms of acceleration, speed of travel and the manner by which idling is achieved. One of the earliest version of car-in-track systems of a flat, platen-like carrier with four horizontally mounted wheels on each corner. These wheels run both on and against two parallel tracking rails providing support for the carrier as well as lateral guidance. The driving force is derived from a constantly spinning tube running parallel to the guidepath, beneath the carrier. A fifth drive wheel mounted beneath the carrier makes contact with the spinning tube, resulting in a variation of worm style transmission. By controlling the set angle of the drive wheel the carrier speed can be infinitely varied up to a maximum in the 400 feet per minute range.