Glossary


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1) Overhead conveyor

A form of conveyor consisting of a continuous chain running beneath a continuous, stationary, flanged rail. Individual carriers spaced equidistant along the length of the conveyor are suspended from the chain. The chain pulls the carriers. Vertical support is derived from the fact that the carriers are also connected to a small trolley with wheels that roll cross sections, trolleys and carriers. A few common carriers include a tray, platform or simple hook. A less common alternative to the chain drive is a worm drive.

2) Non-contact accumulation conveyor

Non -contact accumulation on a conveyor occurs when the product is accumulated with a definite space between each accumulated load. This is accomplished by controlling the speed of the carrying surface. Most zero pressure conveyors are of the non contact type.

3) Minimum pressure accumulation conveyor

Conveyor minimum pressure accumulation is when product is accumulated and the driving force is not removed. It is called minimum pressure because the pressure of the driving force is kept to a minimum. Pressure will build up as more product accumulates, but can be overcome with controls designed specifically for the application. The advantage to minimum pressure conveyor is a higher discharge or single load release rate than with zero pressure accumulation.

4) Magnetic belt conveyor

A steel belt and either a magnetic slider bed or magnetic pulley is used to transport ferrous materials vertically, upside down, and around corners.

5) Motor driven pusher

An electric motor driven conveyor sortation device.  See Pneumatic pusher .

6) Order picking

Order picking or order selection is the process of retrieving individual items (from storage locations) for the purpose of fulfilling an order for a customer. Schemes by which to achieve efficient order picking will vary widely. However, in all cases it involves locating the items in storage; creating a plan for retrieving the items; physically picking the items (either automatically or manually); sorting and/or assembling them into discrete orders; and in the end even packaging the orders for delivery. Although defined as a process, order picking cannot be achieved without the appropriate computer software and mechanical equipment, including the storage medium, such as pallet racks, shelving, AS/RS (including carousels) and flow delivery racks, and a means for transporting items from receiving to storage and from storage to packaging and shipment. A variety of industrial trucks and conveyors will be found in most order picking applications. Order picking may also involve robotic like devices for physically picking discrete items from their storage location. See also Warehouse Management Systems or WMS .