Equipment Photos


1. Portable Lift Tables – Manually Actuated
Light capacity (usually under one ton) mobile scissors lifts that are actuated up and down by means of a foot or hand pump, or by a pre-loaded mechanical spring. These lifts are pushed like a hand cart between work stations and typically used to ergonomically transfer and position heavy unit loads.

 

2. Portable Lift Tables – Powered
Low capacity (usually under two tons) mobile scissors lifts that are connected to batteries or building utilities and powered up and down via an operator pushbutton or lever controls. These lifts are easily pushed or pulled between work stations and typically used to ergonomically transfer and position heavy unit and palletized loads.

 

3. Self-Leveling Scissors Tables
Low capacity (usually under two tons), self-contained lift tables that self-level up and down by means of one or more pre-loaded mechanical or pneumatic springs. The spring forces can usually be adjusted to accommodate a specific range of load capacities, and the lifts are typically used to ergonomically position palletized loads.

 

4. Ground Level Scissors Table
Stationary scissors lift design which places the scissors arms and actuators outboard to each side of the lift to allow a very low profile (usually under one inch) elevating platform to be placed on or near the floor in between the scissors. This allows ground level loading via pallet jacks and carts, and is a popular alternative to mounting a conventional lift table in a pit.

 

5. Hydraulic Scissors Tables – Work Positioning
Hydraulic lifts are the most versatile and economic of all scissors lift styles and can be driven by AC, DC, or Shop Air power supplies. These lifts are commonly used to ergonomically position large unit or palletized loads (usually under four tons) to prevent the unsafe bending and lifting of excessive loads. Common applications are pallet build-up or break-down stations, end of conveyor stations, and assembly lines.

 

6. Pneumatic Scissors Tables – Work Positioning
Pneumatic lifts are popular due to their inability to leak fluid and their use of common shop air supply to power the lifts. These lifts are commonly used to ergonomically position large unit or palletized loads (usually under three tons) to minimize repetitive and harmful bending and lifting of excessive loads. Common applications are pallet build-up or break-down stations, end of conveyor stations, and assembly lines.

 

7. Mechanical Scissors Tables
Mechanical scissors lifts are often specified when accuracy and repeatability are critical, when loads must be held in raised positions for extended periods of time, or when used in “clean room” environments. There are a variety of mechanical actuator designs which can be used, and are sized according to capacity, speed, and duty.

 

8. Heavy Duty Scissors Lifts
Heavy duty lift tables (between 4 ton and 40 ton capacities) are comprised of single or multiple scissors mechanisms working in unison to transfer or position heavy unit or wheeled loads. These lifts use hydraulic or mechanical actuators and are commonly used in assembly lines, loading docks, mills, foundries, or other processes where heavy loads are common.

 

9. High Travel Scissors Tables
High travel lift tables (normally between 5 and 15 feet of travel) utilize one or more single-high scissors mechanisms to raise a wide range of weights and types of loads. These lifts require larger shop floor “footprints” to store the longer legs needed for high travel applications, and common applications include personnel work platforms, mezzanine access, conveyor lines, or other processes where large changes in elevation are necessary.

 

10. Multiple Stage Scissors Lift Tables
Multiple stage scissors lifts are comprised of two or more scissors mechanisms (or “pantographs”) that are either pinned or simply-stacked on top of each other to raise a wide range of weights and types of loads. These lifts are popular because they consume smaller shop floor “footprints” to achieve higher travels. Common applications include personnel work platforms, mezzanine access, conveyor lines, or other processes where large changes in elevation are necessary.