Standards


MHI provides this first-stop resource to material handling related standards. Standards help people and organizations work with a common understanding of products and processes to promote safety, efficiency, interchangeability, and reliability.

Purchase Standards

Download a list of standards

Designation Date Standard
ANSI MH1-20162016Pallet, Slip Sheets, & Other Bases for Unit Loads

This standard pertains to pallets used in the unit-load method of assembling, stacking, storing, handling, and transporting materials and products. The standards were to accomplish the following: define terminology and nomenclature associated with pallets; apply to pallets irrespective of components and materials used in their fabrication; provide a series of recommended pallet dimensions and sizes; describe procedures for pallet sampling, inspection, and testing.
ANSI MH10.8.1-20052005Linear Bar Code & 2-Dimensional Symbols

This standard specifies the minimum requirements for the design of labels containing linear bar code and two-dimensional symbols on transport units to convey data between trading partners, provides for traceability units to convey data between trading partners, provides guidance for the formatting on the label of data presented in linear bar code, two-dimensional symbol, or human readable form, provides specific recommendations regarding the choice of linear bar code and two-dimensional symbologies, and specifies quality requirements, makes recommendations as to label placement, size, and the inclusion of free text and any appropriate graphics, provides guidance in the selection of label material.
ANSI MH10.8.2-20162016Data Identifier and Application Identifier Standard

This standard provides a comprehensive dictionary of MH 10/SC 8 Data Identifiers and GS1 Application identifiers, provides for the assignment of new Data Identifiers, as required, and provides a document detailing the correlation, or mapping, of Data Identifiers to Aplication Identifiers, where a correlation exists.
ANSI MH10.8.3-20042004Transfer Data Syntax for High Capacity ADC Media

This standard specifies a transfer structure, syntax, and coding of messages and data formats when using high capacity ADC media between trading partners, specifically between suppliers and recipients, and where applicable, in support of carrier applications, such as bills of lading and carrier sortation and tracking.
ANSI MH10.8.6-20132013Bar Codes & Two-Dimensional Symbols for Packaging

This standard is an application standard for the marking of product packages with linear bar code and two-dimensional symbols. It defines minimum requirements for identifying product packages that are distributed outside the originating location. It specifies label data content and requirements, including data element requirements; data representation; rules for encoding of mandatory and optional elements in machine-readable symbols; and human readable information.
ANSI MH10.8.7-20052005Labeling & Direct Product Marking

This standard establishes machine-readable (linear, two dimensional, and composite symbols) and human readable content for direct marking and labeling of items, parts, and components. This standard provides a means for items, parts and components to be marked and read in either fixtured or handheld scanning environments at any manufacturer’s facility and then read by customers purchasing items for subsequent manufacturing operations or for final end use. Intended applications include, but are not limited to supply chain applications, e.g., inventory, distribution, manufacturing, quality control, acquisition, transportation, supply, repair, and disposal. Location and application methods of marking are not defined herein.
ANSI MH10.8.8-20062006Radio Frequency ID for Packages, Parcels and Mail

This standard provides guidance for the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) for the handling and tracking of packages, parcels, and flat mail. The standard identifies minimum data requirements as well as semantic and syntactical recommendations. This standard further provides specific recommendations for the air interface communications of RFID devices based on the application requirements identified by the carriers.
ANSI MH10.8.12-20112011Specification for Material Handling Component

This standard specifies a transfer structure, syntax, and coding of messages and data formats when using high capacity ADC media between trading partners, specifically between suppliers and recipients, and where applicable, in support of carrier applications, such as bills of lading and carrier sortation and tracking.
ANSI MH10.8.15:20112011Specification for XML Reader Output from ISO/IEC 15434

This standard specifies, for an Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) reader manufacturer, the preferred output of an AIDC reader when processing ISO/IEC 15434 formatted data. The standard is intended to cover the processing of all AIDC media. It specifies that the output be provided in an XML format suitable for display in Internet Explorer and usable in other applications. The specifications are intended to cover the output from processing of all current and future Format Indicators included in ISO/IEC 15434.
ANSI MH24.1-20052005Standard for Horizontal Carousel Material Handling and Associated Equipment

This standard provides requirements set forth to protect personnel by guiding owners, employers, and supervisors who have the final responsibility for carousel equipment safety in the proper use of the equipment and safety features incorporated in the system. This standard excludes equipment included within the scope of ASME B20.1 (conveyors).
CMAA Specification #70, Revised 20152015Specifications for Top Running Bridge & Gantry Type Multiple Girder Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes

This specification contains information which should be helpful to the purchasers and users of cranes and to the engineering and architectural professions. While much of this information must be of a general nature, the items listed may be checked with individual manufacturers and comparisons made which can lead to optimum selection of equipment.
CMAA Specification #74, Revised 20152015Specifications for Top Running & Under Running Single Girder Electric Traveling Cranes Untilizing Under Running Trolley Hoist

This specification promotes standardization and provides a basis for uniform quality and performance. It contains information which can be helpful for purchasers and users of cranes, as well as engineers and architects. Text consists of seven sections: general specifications, crane service classifications, structural design, mechanical design, electrical equipment, crane inquiry data sheet and glossary.
CMAA Specification #78, Revised 20022002Standards and Guidelines For Professional Services Performed on Overhead Traveling Cranes and Associated Hoisting Equipment

Specification 78 has been purposely developed by CMAA to recognize overhead traveling crane service and the service of associated hoisting equipment as an "industry" worthy of having guidelines and standards for providing high-quality, professional services performed by safety-minded, manufacturer-trained and certified technicians. With the introduction of Specification 78, CMAA intends to set higher performance standards and raise customer expectations related to the service of overhead traveling cranes and associated hoisting equipment.
CMAA Specification #79, Revised 20122012Crane Operator's Manual

This manual has been prepared by the Engineering Committee of the Crane Manufacturers Association of America, Inc. Operation of an overhead or gantry crane involved more than operating the controls of the crane. The operator must consider and anticipate the motions and actions that will occur as a result of operating the controls. Specification 79 also lists qualification required to be a crane operator, as well as “shall and shall nots” for operators.
ANSI ECMA15-20102010Specifications for Cable-less Controls for Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes

This standard provides information regarding the regulatory requirements, safety benefits and applications for radio frequency directional devices used in controlling the movements and actions of electric overhead traveling cranes in material handling applications. The scope is limited to remote or cable-less controlling devices that utilize radio frequency as a means of transmitting directions and information to electric overhead traveling cranes.
ANSI ICWM-20122012ANSI ICWM Performance Standard for Casters & Wheels

This standard provides a common basis for evaluating the safety, durability, structural adequacy, and technical requirements for category specific casters and wheels (Furniture Chair Casters, Furniture Non-Chair Casters, Industrial Casters, Institutional and Medical Equipment Bed Casters). It efines industry terms, specific tests, equipment and methods that can be used, conditions of tests, and minimum acceptance levels used in evaluation. The acceptance levels are based on field and test experiences.
ANSI MH29.1:20122012Safety Requirements for Industrial Scissors Lifts

This standard provides operational and safety guidance associated with personnel operating industrial scissor lifts. Mobile and stationary industrial scissors lifts can raise lower and position materials and personnel in various applications but are different from other conveyances such as aerial work platforms (AWP) and elevators.
ANSI MH30.1-20152015Performance and Testing Requirements for Dock Leveling Devices

This standard serves as the guide for designers, manufacturers, sellers, installers, owners, users and governing bodies of dock levelers and to provide guidelines for the design and testing of dock leveling devices, to promote the understanding of the respective responsibilities of manufacturers, sellers, installers, owners, users and governing bodies associated with dock leveling devices, and to provide a uniform means of comparison for dock leveling devices.
ANSI MH30.2-20152015Performance and Testing of Portable Dock Leveling Devices

This standard defines performance and testing requirements for the design, use, and maintenance of portable dock leveling devices. The purpose of this standard is to provide a uniform means of comparison, improve user confidence and knowledge and to define product requirements for portable dock leveling devices.
ANSI MH30.3-20052015Performance and Testing of Vehicle Restraining Devices

This standard defines performance and testing requirements with regard to design, use, and maintenance of vehicle restraining devices. The purposes of this standard are to provide a uniform means of comparison, to improve user confidence and knowledge, and to define requirements for vehicle restraining devices.
ANSI MH27.1-20092009Specifications for Patented Track Underhung Cranes and Monorail Systems

This standard applies to underhung cranes whose end trucks operate on the lower flange of a patented-track runway section; and to carriers (trolleys) operating on single-track patented-track monorail systems, including all curves, switches, transfer devices, lift and drop sections, and associated equipment. Systems used for transporting personnel require special considerations and are not included in this standard.
ANSI MH27.2-20092009Specifications for Enclosed Track Underhung Cranes and Monorail Systems

This standard applies to underhung cranes whose end trucks operate on the internal flange of a runway using enclosed track section, and to trolleys (carriers) operating on single-track monorail systems, including all curves, switches transfer devices, lift and drop sections, and associated equipment. Systems used for transporting personnel require special considerations and are not included in this standard.
ANSI MH16.1-201240921Specification for the Design, Testing and Utilization of Industrial Steel Storage Racks

The standard applies to industrial pallet racks, movable shelf racks, and stacker racks made of cold-formed or hot-rolled steel structural members. It does not apply to other types of racks, such as drive-in or drive-through racks, cantilever racks, portable racks, etc. or to racks made of material other than steel.
ANSI MH16.32016Design, Testing and Utilization of Industrial Steel Cantilever Storage Racks

This standard provides requirements set forth for cantilevered storage racks, and covers integrity of installations, loading and forces (including seismic), design procedures, design of columns and arms, bracing design, connections and special design provisions.
ANSI MH26.2-20072007Design, Testing and Utilization of Welded-Wire Rack Decking

This standard is established to provide a guideline for design, testing, and utilization of welded-wire mesh rack decking. It applies to uniformly loaded rack decking fabricated from welded-wire mesh, with permanently attached reinforcements, for use in storage racks. The purpose for such rack decking is to provide storage capability by creating a surface, in conjunction with a superstructure or framework hereinafter referred to as rack, upon which to place materials that may be on pallets, in containers, or in some other form.
ANSI MH28.2-20122012Design and Testing of Boltless Metal-Wood Shelving

This standard applies to boltless metal-wood shelving exclusively used for the storage by hand of small to bulky type material. The shelving framing is composed of boltless connections. Units consist of cold-formed steel members supporting a surface of particleboard, mat-formed wood particle- board, plywood or other wood products.
ANSI MH28.3-20092009Design, Manufacture, and Installation of Industrial Steel Work Platforms

An industrial steel work platform is a prefabricated elevated platform located in an industrial environment, pre-designed using a steel framing system. Flooring may include other structural or non-structural elements such as, but not limited to, concrete, steel, and/or engineered wood-products. This Specification is intended to be applied to the design, manufacturing, installation, and maintenance of such structures.

National material handling related standards are developed by a variety of Standards Developing Organizations (SDOs), each following their own set of procedures approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Some organizations also create specifications and guidelines, but they may not be approved by ANSI.

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is solely responsible for the development of international standards procedures. Member countries of ISO form the voting body for balloting (one vote per country). Individual experts within those countries serve on those committees to help develop the draft standards and ready them for international balloting.

American National Standards and MHI

MHI is accredited by ANSI to develop American National Standards. MHI has two sets of procedures, one for what is known as the Canvass Method for developing standards, plus one for standing Standards Development Committees.

The following MHI groups currently develop standards and follow the Canvass Method of development:

Another MHI affiliated group, the Crane Manufacturers Association of America (CMAA) has developed and published a variety of specifications that are widely used by industry. CMAA specifications do not follow MHI procedures for development and are not approved by ANSI.

MHI also administers the following national committees developing American National Standards according to MHI's Committee Method [**whatever this PDF file link is named when the site is developed**] procedures:

  • MH1 Committee on Pallets and Other Bases for Unit Loads
  • MH10 Committee on Unit-Loads and Transport-Packages

International Standards and MHI

MHI is also accredited by ANSI to administer the development of U.S. positions on international standards. This work is performed through the following U.S. Technical Advisory Groups (USTAGs):

  • USTAG to TC 51 on Pallets for Unit Load Method of Materials Handling
  • USTAG to TC 104 on Freight Containers
  • USTAG to TC 122 on Packaging

Why have standards?

Standards help users, designers, manufacturers, distributors, installers, etc. work with a common understanding of products and processes to promote safety, efficiency, interchangeability, and reliability.

Doesn't ANSI develop standards?

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) does not develop, write or review the technical content of standards. ANSI leaves that work up to organizations that they accredit to perform the process. MHI, as an accredited standards developing organization, acts as a facilitator to aid groups of MHI member companies and other companies/organizations in the development of standards. ANSI determines whether a fair and proper process was followed in developing each standard, plus they perform regular audits of developers. ANSI is a privately funded organization and is not part of the government. ANSI serves as the United States representative of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and places all US votes for international standards.

Are MHI standards mandatory?

MHI's ANSI Accredited Standards are voluntary because they are not required by law. They only become mandatory when trading partners use them as part of their contracts or if they are adopted and required by codes or regulations. When standards are referenced and used enough within industry, they become part of best practice. Litigation often relies on whether companies were following industry best practices. MHI cannot require any member company to follow a standard as a requirement of membership.

How long is a standard valid?

ANSI requires standards developers to revise, reaffirm (essentially reapprove standards as is), or withdraw standards every five years. Extensions of this time will be granted by ANSI with good reason. Under no circumstances are standards allowed to go past ten years without taking one of these steps. At the ten year mark, ANSI will administratively withdraw a standard. MHI standards developing groups generally begin the revise/reaffirm/withdraw decision process at around the three year mark from a standard's approval date so work may be completed by the five year mark.

Who can participate in the development or review of a standard?

MHI standards are typically developed within one of MHI's industry groups. Those groups develop and approve draft standards then make them available for review and balloting through public review. ANSI requires that any "materially affected and interested party shall have the ability to participate” in the development and review of standards. This is typically satisfied through the public review process, providing anyone with an interest in the standard with the ability to participate.

Does MHI have procedures for development of standards?

MHI has two sets of procedures that are approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). One set of procedures is focused on the standards that are developed by groups of reviewers that are formed each time a standard is created, revised, or reaffirmed (reapproved as is). The second set of procedures is focused on the operation of standing committees that develop and maintain a variety of standards (currently the MH 10 committee on Unit-Loads and Transport-Packages, plus the MH 1 committee on Pallets, Slip Sheets and Other Bases for Unit-Loads). For international standards administration focused on developing US opinions on international standards, MHI follows ANSI model procedures available on the ANSI site.

Other resources for Frequently Asked Questions

A variety of MHI product groups (Rack Manufacturers Institute, Loading Dock Equipment Manufacturers, Monorail Manufacturers Association, plus several others) will develop and vote on draft standards. They serve as only the first step in the process. The canvass method requires formation of a separate canvass group to review and vote on a standard. By the time that the canvass group is formed, an MHI product group has already developed and internally approved a standard. External, open, public review is required by ANSI. Any individual or organization that is materially affected by the proposed standard has an opportunity to become part of the canvass group. The canvass groups generally are formed and operate only during a single development and maintenance cycle of a particular standard. They are then essentially disbanded until the next revision or reaffirmation of the standard. The flow of standards development steps are as follows:

Project Initiation

Any MHI product group that plans to develop or has started development of a new standard, a revision, or a reaffirmation, notifies the MHI technical director in writing. Depending on the type of work proposed, MHI may need to file paperwork with ANSI to expand our scope of development description or MHI may need to work with other organizations to coordinate on the development of the standard. Every new project (even revisions of existing standards) requires that MHI file a form using ANSI's Project Initiation Notification System (PINS). The PINS form generates a public notice by ANSI that work has begun on a project. It allows other organizations or individuals to pose questions regarding the scope and intent of the work, plus it serves as another way to solicit anyone wanting to participate in review of the standard.

Group Approval and Canvass Group Formation

MHI groups then typically continue development of a standard until they take a formal internal vote of approval. At that point the standard is ready for external public review. The canvass group performing the review will be formed by soliciting reviewers both through MHI existing contacts, public notices (in trade publications and ANSI Standards Action), plus contacts that each group provides as people that are knowledgeable regarding the product/process. The canvass group formation process is a minimum of 30 days, but typically takes 60-90 days because of the need to involve member companies in the identification and recruitment of reviewers. Once the group is formed, they are sent a packet of materials, including the standard and a ballot.

Public Review, Balloting, and Comment Resolution

Once balloting begins by the canvass review group, MHI also notifies ANSI that public review has begun so they may post a public notice in their Standards Action publication. These reviews are usually 45 days upon publication of the ANSI public notice. Comments received from the public review must be addressed by the group developing the standard. Generally, MHI tries for 100% acceptance of a standard by working with all the reviewers that provide comments, but there may be cases where a few unresolved objections may take place. In those cases, additional paperwork must be filed with ANSI, but it does not block the standard from being approved. ANSI's requirement is that 2/3 of all ballots (minus abstentions) must approve the standard, plus a majority of the canvass group members must approve the standard.

Once ANSI has approved a standard, it is prepared for publication, then offered for sale and/or download. Groups are responsible for their PR efforts.

Project Initiation
(30 day minimum)
Committee Development and Approval
(timing depends on group, 15 day ballot requirement)
Public Review by Canvass Reviewers
(45 day minimum)
Resolution of Comments
(zero days if no comments)
ANSI Approval
(from one day to six weeks depending on ANSI schedule)
Publication and Promotion

ANSI Approved Procedures for MHI Canvass Method

Note. Although many organizations develop standards by the canvass method, each organization's standards development processes may be different and are individually approved by ANSI. The following MHI canvass method will help you understand the general process. MHI is also ANSI accredited through a separate committee method set of procedures.

MHI currently administers two standing committees that follow a set of MHI procedures approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI):

  • MH1 committee on Pallets, Slip Sheets and Other Bases for Unit-Loads
  • MH10 committee on Unit-Loads and Transport-Packages

These standing committees develop and vote on a variety of standards within their scope of effort. Public review of the draft standards is also provided during their balloting process, so any individual or organization that is materially affected by the proposed standard has an opportunity to become part of the review. The flow of standards development steps within the committee method of development are as follows:

Project Initiation

Any MH committee that plans to develop or has started development of a new standard, a revision, or a reaffirmation (essentially approval of an existing standard), notifies the MHI technical director in writing. If a subcommittee exists with a more specific scope that covers that standard, the subcommittee will follow its own procedures to review the proposed work and make a recommendation to the parent committee to officially create the new work project. Every new project (even revisions of existing standards) requires that MHI file a form using ANSI's Project Initiation Notification System (PINS). The PINS form generates a public notice by ANSI that work has begun on a project. It allows other organizations or individuals to pose questions regarding the scope and intent of the work.

Subcommittee or Group Approval

MH committees then typically continue development of a standard within a subcommittee until they take a formal internal vote of approval. At that point the standard is ready for full committee review and public review.

Public Review, Balloting, and Comment Resolution

Once balloting begins by the MH committee, MHI also notifies ANSI that public review has begun so they may post a public notice in their Standards Action publication. These reviews are usually 45 days upon publication of the ANSI public notice. Comments received from the committee members and the public review must be addressed by the group developing the standard. Generally, MHI tries for 100% acceptance of a standard by working with all the reviewers that provide comments, but there may be cases where objections may be unresolved. In those cases, additional paperwork must be filed with ANSI, but it does not block the standard from being approved as long as 2/3 of all ballots (minus abstentions) are approvals of the standard, plus a majority of the committee members approve the standard.

Once the committee and ANSI have approved a standard, it is prepared for publication, then offered for sale and/or download.

Project Initiation
(30 day minimum)
Subcommittee Development and Approval
(timing depends on subcommittee procedures)
Committee and Public Review
(45 day minimum)
Resolution of Comments
(zero days if no comments)
ANSI Approval
(from one day to six weeks depending on ANSI schedule)
Publication and Promotion

ANSI Approved Procedures for MH Committees

Note. Although many organizations develop standards by the committee method, each organization's standards development processes may be different and are individually approved by ANSI. The following MHI canvass method will help you understand the general process. MHI is also ANSI accredited through a separate canvass method set of procedures.

Standardization of nomenclature, types, sizes, materials, and components of pallets, slip sheets, and other unit load bases, including sampling, inspection, and test procedures.

Standards: MH1:2016 Pallets, Slip Sheets, and Other Bases for Unit Loads

The MHI role in MH1 and other similar committee method focused standards groups is to facilitate and coordinate the overall committee efforts. Committee activity primarily takes place through members focused on one of the fourteen parts of the standard. MH1 hosts an annual meeting for the membership, typically held in Washington in late May.

Procedures Followed by MH1 Committee

MHI serves as the secretariat for the accredited standards developing committee MH10: Unit-Loads and Transport-Packages. The scope of the committee effort is as follows:

"To facilitate freight movement within transportation and distribution systems by providing standards for transport-packages and unit-loads, including their dimensions, definitions, terminology, coding, labeling, and performance criteria; and to represent the United States' interests within the scope of ISO/TC 122 - Packaging."

MH10 Subcommittees and Officers (Chair / Vice-Chair)

The MHI role in MH10 and other similar committee method focused standards groups is to facilitate and coordinate the overall committee efforts. Committee activity primarily takes place through subcommittees concentrating on unit-load and transport-package issues such as: sizes, heights, testing, environment, terminology, and coding/labeling. Working groups may be formed by subcommittees to address more specific issues.

The MH10 committee is also the US Technical Advisory Group (USTAG) to ANSI for ISO/TC 122 – Packaging. The TC stands for Technical Committee. In this capacity, MH10 acts as the US voice to the international standards development community concerning packaging issues.

MHI also administers a subcommittee MH10.4 on Packaging and Environment to serve as the U.S. voice on packaging/environmental/sustainability issues. A series of standards have been developed by this subcommittee.

Procedures Followed by MH10 Committee

AttachmentSize
MH10.8.2_CM_20160922.pdf
ANS MH10.8.2 is an ANSI Continuous Maintenance (CM) standard. This means that this document is the most current MH10.8.2 standard. Periodically the standard is balloted in its entirety, after which time the entire document is in black type and the maintenance summary is once again blank to accommodate additional entries.
2.52 MB
Apply for new data identifier or for data identifier interpretation.
Apply for New Data Identifier
 
Assigned_Relative_OID_DI_table_10SEP2014.xls
ISO/IEC 15962 defines various ways to encode data with an ISO/IEC 18000-63, Type C radio-frequency identification tag. One of those ways is the use of relative object identifiers (relative OIDs). The effective use of relative OIDs requires the maintenance of a Relative OID table which is publicly accessible. The above table is current as of the date noted in its title. This document also shows all “5N” Data Identifiers maintained by AIAG.
150 KB

Standardization of pallets in general use in the form of platforms or trays on which goods may be packed to form unit loads for handling by mechanical devices.

The MHI role in the USTAG to TC 51 is to facilitate and coordinate the overall committee efforts to develop U.S. positions on international standards. Committee activity primarily takes place through teleconferencing.

International freight container design, testing, handling and use including the exchange of data relating to container identification, cargo, stowage and security.

The MHI role in the USTAG to TC 104 is to facilitate and coordinate the overall committee efforts to develop U.S. positions on international standards. Committee activity primarily takes place through email and teleconferencing.