Glossary


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1) Control

Controls refer to the control devices (and software) required to operate powered, mechanical material handling equipment. It is the emphasis on control that ultimately leads to an integrated system and brings about the level of coordination in material and information flow that is desired. With automated information handling, the word "controls" embraces specific pieces of hardware, software, a communication network and the human user interfaces used to capture and transmit data and instruction and invoke action. See also Integrated Systems & Controls .

2) Controller

A device by means of which the operator controls the speed, acceleration, torque and/or direction or motor driven equipment.

3) Angular creep

Extremely slow speed movement of a tilter that is the result of normal, internal leakage of fluid control valves.

4) Collision prevention

The use of sensors to detect the presence of objects and, through the use of integrated controls, prevent a collision between two objects from occurring.

5) AEM

A conveying system which consists of monorail track, track mounted electrification, individually powered vehicles, a supporting structure, a control system, lifts, switches and turntables.

6) Automated Electrified Monorail

Automated Electrified Monorail describes a conveying system which consists of monorail track, track mounted electrification, individually powered vehicles, a supporting structure, a control system, lifts, switches and turntables as are necessary.

7) Automatic data capture

The technologies that support the identification and direct collection of data into a computer system or other micro-processor-controlled device without using a keyboard.  Such technologies include bar code, radio frequency data communication, radio frequency identification and other emerging technologies.

8) AS/RS

AS/RS is becoming a generic term that today refers to a variety of means under computer control for automatically depositing and retrieving loads from defined storage locations. See also  Carousels . Although both of these technologies have roots that go back some 40 to 50 years, it is only since the late 1990s that AS/RS has been used to refer to more than crane and aisle applications.

9) Carousel

Carousels are a technology used to store items for eventual picking or retrieval. There are two primary types of carousels and one related technology, all of which operate under some form of computer control. Since the late 1990s, carousels have been placed under the more general category of AS/RS. See also Horizontal Carousels , Vertical Carousels ,  Vertical Lift Modules and/or AS/RS .

10) Automatic Storage & Retrieval Systems

AS/RS is becoming a generic term that today refers to a variety of means under computer control for automatically depositing and retrieving loads from defined storage locations. See also  Carousels . Although both of these technologies have roots that go back some 40 to 50 years, it is only since the late 1990s that AS/RS has been used to refer to more than crane and aisle applications.

11) AGVS

An Automatic Guided Vehicle System, or AGVS consists of one or more computer controlled wheel based load carriers (normally battery powered) that runs on the plant floor (or if outdoors on a paved area) without the need for an onboard operator or driver. AGVs have defined paths or areas within which or over which they can navigate. Navigation is achieved by any one of several means, including following a path defined by buried inductive wires, surface mounted magnetic or optical strips; or alternatively by way of inertial or laser guidance. See also SGV , Self Guided Vehicle , Unit Load AGV , and/or Tugger AGV .

12) Automatic Guided Vehicle System

An Automatic Guided Vehicle System, or AGVS consists of one or more computer controlled wheel based load carriers (normally battery powered) that runs on the plant floor (or if outdoors on a paved area) without the need for an onboard operator or driver. AGVs have defined paths or areas within which or over which they can navigate. Navigation is achieved by any one of several means, including following a path defined by buried inductive wires, surface mounted magnetic or optical strips; or alternatively by way of inertial or laser guidance. See also SGV , Self Guided Vehicle , Unit Load AGV , and/or  Tugger AGV .

13) Car-in-track conveyor

A sophisticated version of asynchronous carriers with greater flexibility inherent in the drive systems in terms of acceleration, speed of travel and the manner by which idling is achieved. One of the earliest version of car-in-track systems of a flat, platen-like carrier with four horizontally mounted wheels on each corner. These wheels run both on and against two parallel tracking rails providing support for the carrier as well as lateral guidance. The driving force is derived from a constantly spinning tube running parallel to the guidepath, beneath the carrier. A fifth drive wheel mounted beneath the carrier makes contact with the spinning tube, resulting in a variation of worm style transmission. By controlling the set angle of the drive wheel the carrier speed can be infinitely varied up to a maximum in the 400 feet per minute range.