Glossary


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1) Single deep selective rack

Rack structure which allows loads to be stored one unit deep on either side of an aisle.

2) Stretchwrapping

Unitizing a load by stretching and wrapping a plastic sheet tightly over the load.

3) Unitizer

Any type of equipment which aggregates several items into a single unit load.

4) Automated dispenser

A series of vertical product dispensers which kick individual units of products out the bottom onto a conveyor.

5) Load bearing surface

Actual area of material in contact with and supporting a unit load.

6) Stacking interlock

Refers to the mechanism that locks containers when they are stacked on top of another container.  This feature allows safe and secure shipping load units.

7) Material Handling Principles

A principle is a general rule, fundamental, or other statement of an observed truth. Over time certain fundamental truths of material handling have been found to exist. The "principles" of material handling are often useful in analyzing, planning and managing material handling activities and systems. At the very least they form a basic foundation upon which one can begin building expertise in material handling. These principles, that serve as a starting point to identifying potential problems and assessing need, are: 1. Planning 2. Standardization 3. Work 4. Ergonomic 5. Unit Load 6. Space Utilization 7. System 8. Automation 9. Environment 10. Life Cycle Cost To receive a complete explanation for each of these :"Principles", contact the Material Handling Institute at (704) 676-1190 and ask for the document, "The Ten Principles of Material Handling".

8) Principles

A principle is a general rule, fundamental, or other statement of an observed truth. Over time certain fundamental truths of material handling have been found to exist. The "principles" of material handling are often useful in analyzing, planning and managing material handling activities and systems. At the very least they form a basic foundation upon which one can begin building expertise in material handling. These principles, that serve as a starting point to identifying potential problems and assessing need, are: 1. Planning 2. Standardization 3. Work 4. Ergonomic 5. Unit Load 6. Space Utilization 7. System 8. Automation 9. Environment 10. Life Cycle Cost To receive a complete explanation for each of these :"Principles", contact the Material Handling Institute at (704) 676-1190 and ask for the document, "The Ten Principles of Material Handling".

9) Ten Principles

A principle is a general rule, fundamental, or other statement of an observed truth. Over time certain fundamental truths of material handling have been found to exist. The "principles" of material handling are often useful in analyzing, planning and managing material handling activities and systems. At the very least they form a basic foundation upon which one can begin building expertise in material handling. These principles, that serve as a starting point to identifying potential problems and assessing need, are: 1. Planning 2. Standardization 3. Work 4. Ergonomic 5. Unit Load 6. Space Utilization 7. System 8. Automation 9. Environment 10. Life Cycle Cost To receive a complete explanation for each of these :"Principles", contact the Material Handling Institute at (704) 676-1190 and ask for the document, "The Ten Principles of Material Handling".

10) 10 Principles

A principle is a general rule, fundamental, or other statement of an observed truth. Over time certain fundamental truths of material handling have been found to exist. The "principles" of material handling are often useful in analyzing, planning and managing material handling activities and systems. At the very least they form a basic foundation upon which one can begin building expertise in material handling. These principles, that serve as a starting point to identifying potential problems and assessing need, are: 1. Planning 2. Standardization 3. Work 4. Ergonomic 5. Unit Load 6. Space Utilization 7. System 8. Automation 9. Environment 10. Life Cycle Cost To receive a complete explanation for each of these :"Principles", contact the Material Handling Institute at (704) 676-1190 and ask for the document, "The Ten Principles of Material Handling".

11) Honeycombing

1. The practice of removing merchandise in pallet load quantities where the space is not exhausted in an orderly fashion. This results in inefficiencies due to the fact that the received merchandise may not be efficiently stored in the space which is created by the honey-combing. 2. The storing or withdrawal or supplies in a manner that results in vacant space that is not usable for storage of other items. 3.  Creation of unoccupied space resulting from withdrawal of unit loads.  This is one of the major hidden costs of warehousing.

12) Poternoster

A type of vertical conveyor that provides for continuous operation of multiple, equally spaced, load-carrying units fixed to chains that move continuously in an endless loop. With such a system the loading and unloading, usually automatic, occurs while the conveyor is running, resulting in greater throughput and an even flow of loads. This type of vertical conveyor is common in Europe

13) Platform conveyor

Another form of the conventional poternoster (See definition for Poternoster) is the platform conveyor that consists of multiple, equally spaced battens which form rigid horizontal surfaces in one direction (up and down) but behave like the front of a roll top desk on the return. Platform conveyor is an effective means of moving a continuous flow of pallets or other unit loads between levels. Another variation of the posternoster concept, which permits both vertical and horizontal movement of load, consists of freely swinging platforms suspended between two parallel chains.

14) Pneumatic tube system

Also referred to as a vacuum tube system. In all but the simplest of applications, the pneumatic/vacuum tube system however, such as at drive through banks, these systems are capable of very complex networks (upwards of 1000 origin/destination stations) involving branching, switching or merging. The computer control in modern systems make these systems very flexible. The carrying units appear much like a projectile that has to be opened so that the load to be transported can be placed inside. There are units installed where carriers approach 12 inches in diameter and are capable of carrying fairly large parts. The speed of a pneumatic/vacuum system averages 1500 fpm.

15) Pick and place industrial robot

The "pick and place" industrial robot is used to feed or disengage parts or tools to or from a machine, or to transfer parts from one machine to another. A variation of a "pick and place" robot is used to build and undo unit loads on a pallet.