Glossary


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1) Open type shelving

Shelving unit with side and back of the unit open.  Various types of bracing are used to stabilize the unit.

2) Mobile shelving

A shelving system that is mounted on floor or overhead tracks. The self- contained unit may nest or move against other units to facilitate space savings or move away from each other to provide greater access.

3) Multiple row, single face shelving

One generally continuous row of units joined together back to back to be serviced from one aisle for long items of considerable weight.

4) Open upright shelving assembly

An assembly of two posts and one or more pair of side sway braces or panel sway braces welded, riveted or bolted together to form the side of a shelving unit.

5) Manual hoist

A suspended machinery unit that, by use of manual operation, is used for lifting and lowering of a freely suspended (unguided) load.  Generally uses chain (roller or link) as its lifting medium

6) Manipulator

A stationary (does not mean that nothing moves) movement assist device that is often equipped with end effectors for handling different types of loads. End effectors include all forms of grippers, forks, barrel grabs, etc. Manipulators counteract the weight of the load, rendering it almost weightless by way of hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders, or simply by way of counter weights and the exercising of very limited manual control. Most manipulators require manual actuation and control and are therefore manual assist devices. They are mounted to the floor, wall or ceiling. In some cases, manipulators are mounted to a fixed base plate and the entire unit can be moved via a trolley, cart or frok lift truck.

7) Material Handling Principles

A principle is a general rule, fundamental, or other statement of an observed truth. Over time certain fundamental truths of material handling have been found to exist. The "principles" of material handling are often useful in analyzing, planning and managing material handling activities and systems. At the very least they form a basic foundation upon which one can begin building expertise in material handling. These principles, that serve as a starting point to identifying potential problems and assessing need, are: 1. Planning 2. Standardization 3. Work 4. Ergonomic 5. Unit Load 6. Space Utilization 7. System 8. Automation 9. Environment 10. Life Cycle Cost To receive a complete explanation for each of these :"Principles", contact the Material Handling Institute at (704) 676-1190 and ask for the document, "The Ten Principles of Material Handling".